Private Special Education Schools Helping Families From Michigan

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Why consider a private special education school for students from Michigan?

Many parents recognize that a private school could be a more appropriate fit for their child to excel, given that private schools typically provide smaller class sizes with more experiential learning styles. A private special education school takes this one step further, by providing specialized learning approaches specific to the age and academic needs of the population that school works with. Private Special Education Schools Michigan

Private special education schools can also work on skill development outside of the typically academic courses: this can include social skills and daily living tasks. Other items may be more cognitive in nature and reach across both social and academic domains: executive functioning development would be an example of this and should be be addressed in an appropriate way at a private special education school.

Because private special education schools are not required to be regulated in Michigan by the state government, some can and do set their own standards for curriculum and special education services provided. This oversight extends to teachers as well: some private special education schools require teacher certification and licensure while others do not.

New Focus Academy is a private special education school that follows Utah Common Core Curriculum with a focus on the Essential Elements. These are specific statements and skills linked to grade-level expectations in college-and-career-readiness standards for individuals with social-cognitive delays or disabilities. Graduates from New Focus Academy receive a high school diploma and for those transitioning onto another school, the credits earned at New Focus Academy can be  applicable toward graduation in Michigan as well.

Private Special Education Schools Designed to Help Teens from Michigan Succeed

At New Focus Academy, we believe that success extends outside of the classroom and therefore our academic curriculum extends beyond that of a traditional school. We provide practical learning opportunities with small class sizes and individualized attention, approaches, and strategies. Here is an overview of our academic program: Private Special Education SchoolsMichigan

  • Life Skills: This includes important daily skills such as self-assessment, problem solving, decision making, and critical thinking.
  • Functional Math: We want math to translate into the real world and we do this by counting money, budgeting, using calendars, and measuring.
  • Functional Language Arts: This focuses on applicable skills such as identifying important information, reading instructions and schedule, and using adaptive tools independently.
  • Community-Based Living: A cornerstone at New Focus Academy, this includes shopping, time-management, using public transportation, and planning for the unexpected/emergencies
  • Social-Emotional Learning: Practiced daily, this covers social skills, social and physical boundaries, emotional regulation skills, internet safety, and job-specific social skills

This comprehensive and holistic curriculum is designed to help students on the spectrum flourish both while at New Focus Academy and after they leave. Our uniquely abled students thrive in this healthy and safe structure while acquiring the necessary skills to gain independence and navigate the world when they move on.

If you think your teen from Michigan needs assistance in gaining the necessary social, academic, and life skills to gain confidence and independence, call New Focus Academy at (844) 313-6749 to learn more about how we can help your son. We are passionate about helping every student find success in school and beyond.

Resources

Looking for programming options and support in the Northwest? Autism Empowerment is a resource for all ages and dedicated to making life better and more meaningful for individuals and families in the Autism and Asperger communities worldwide. Autism Empowerment also has a quarterly magazine, Spectrum Life Magazine, available in print and online.
Having difficult finding a local provider? Need a local support group? The Autism Society can help with these concerns and more. They has a large online resource database online and is one of the oldest autism advocacy groups. The Autism Society was also instrumental in systemic changes (including developing Section 504, the Developmental Disabilities Act, the Education for All Handicapped Act)  and protections for individuals with autism. If you want to become more involved with public policy and legislation related to autism, the Autism Society is a great place to start.

 

Who does New Focus Academy help?

New Focus Academy helps teens struggling with issues such as the ones listed below:
– Social Pragmatic Communication Disorders
– Nonverbal Learning Disorder
– Sensory Issues
– Social Difficulties
– Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
– Low Processing Speed
– Aspergers
– Developmental Immaturity
– Academic Failure
– Autism
– Academic Difficulties
– Mood Disorders
– Anxiety
– Rigidity
– Low Working Memory
– Traumatic Brain Injuries

New Focus Academy helps families from Michigan

New Focus Academy helps Michigan families from cities and towns like: Franklin Grosse Pointe Shores Orchard Lake Birmingham Bloomfield Hills Bingham Farms Oakland Northville Township Beverly Hills East Grand Rapids
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New Focus Academy help families from Michigan who live in cities like:

Some examples of cities from Michigan which may have families who may be interested in New Focus Academy include: Detroit Grand Rapids Warren Sterling Heights Ann Arbor Lansing Flint Dearborn Livonia Troy Westland Farmington Hills Kalamazoo Wyoming Rochester Hills Southfield Taylor St. Clair Shores Pontiac Royal Oak Novi Dearborn Heights Battle Creek Kentwood Saginaw

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